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http://www.tocker.ca/2013/05/06/when-does-mysql-perform-io.html
 
http://www.tocker.ca/2013/05/06/when-does-mysql-perform-io.html
  
*Percona recommends that you keep the databases on SSDs, but move over the innodb log files, or bin logs to a RAID array backed by a BBU with write cache enabled. I'm not 100% sure about this, as it sometimes makes more sense to just use one large 8 disk array and store all the data on it, instead of splitting this up and using two 4 disk RAID 10s, one with SSDs, the other with SATA or SAS drives. I will need to do more testing to see how quickly the SSDs wear out.  
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*Percona recommends that you keep the databases on SSDs, but '''move over the innodb log files, or bin logs to a RAID array backed by a BBU with write cache enabled.''' I'm not 100% sure about this, as it sometimes makes more sense to just use one large 8 disk array and store all the data on it, instead of splitting this up and using two 4 disk RAID 10s, one with SSDs, the other with SATA or SAS drives. I will need to do more testing to see how quickly the SSDs wear out.  
  
 
*Percona also mentions that since the log writes are very small, which can cause write amplification on an SSD, which could lead to increased latency and quickly degraded drives. I can see how this would happen, however as SSDs get more and more efficient at writes, and more endurance this could be less of an issue. This really seems to depend on what kind of SSDs you use. For instance, you might not run into an issue if you use an Intel DC S3700 drive, but you might kill a cheap consumer SSD in a hurry.  
 
*Percona also mentions that since the log writes are very small, which can cause write amplification on an SSD, which could lead to increased latency and quickly degraded drives. I can see how this would happen, however as SSDs get more and more efficient at writes, and more endurance this could be less of an issue. This really seems to depend on what kind of SSDs you use. For instance, you might not run into an issue if you use an Intel DC S3700 drive, but you might kill a cheap consumer SSD in a hurry.  

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