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Welcome to My MySQL Wiki! There's a ton of stuff on this page that may or may not help you become awesome with MySQL. It's important to remember that MySQL is used by a lot of different software, and the demands are not always the same. Because of this, one does not simply "tune" MySQL by pasting in a ton of settings found in a wiki, even my own. There are still a few important settings that will generally improve performance in most cases, such as innodb_buffer_pool_size, and well, really that's all you need to if you run basic CMS like WordPress or MediaWiki.  
 
Welcome to My MySQL Wiki! There's a ton of stuff on this page that may or may not help you become awesome with MySQL. It's important to remember that MySQL is used by a lot of different software, and the demands are not always the same. Because of this, one does not simply "tune" MySQL by pasting in a ton of settings found in a wiki, even my own. There are still a few important settings that will generally improve performance in most cases, such as innodb_buffer_pool_size, and well, really that's all you need to if you run basic CMS like WordPress or MediaWiki.  
  
I've taken a screenshot of the [http://newrelic.com/NewRelic NewRelic Dashboard] for my own site to put some things into perspective when it comes to MySQL performance. You can see in the image below that MySQL only accounts for a small amount of my application's response time. MySQL only took around 18ms (milliseconds) to complete it's work. Meanwhile, PHP took around 100ms to complete it's request, over 5 times longer than MySQL. The point is that there is no point in spending too much time trying to make MySQL faster, it's usually the least of your worries when it comes to website response times. If you notice MySQL taking a significant amount of time to respond to requests, then it might be worth trying to tune it up a little, but if your application response times look similar to mine, then you are probably good to go.  
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I've taken a screenshot of the [http://newrelic.com/NewRelic Dashboard] for my own site to put some things into perspective when it comes to MySQL performance. You can see in the image below that MySQL only accounts for a small amount of my application's response time. MySQL only took around 18ms (milliseconds) to complete it's work. Meanwhile, PHP took around 100ms to complete it's request, over 5 times longer than MySQL. The point is that there is no point in spending too much time trying to make MySQL faster, it's usually the least of your worries when it comes to website response times. If you notice MySQL taking a significant amount of time to respond to requests, then it might be worth trying to tune it up a little, but if your application response times look similar to mine, then you are probably good to go.  
  
 
[[File:MySQL_wiki_new_relic_app_response_time_breakdown.jpg|600px]]
 
[[File:MySQL_wiki_new_relic_app_response_time_breakdown.jpg|600px]]

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